Syllabus

GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY II

The essential “big picture” questions we will consider in this course include:

  • How are governments formed?
  • How do they stabilize, centralize, and sometimes lose control?
  • How do turning points change history?
  • How do cooperation and competition between nations impact the international community and the lives of individuals in the countries involved?
  • How does globalization impact institutions, nations, international relations, and the lives of individuals?

Below are outlines of the units and content we will cover this year.  Readings for all units will be comprised of both textbook and teacher-distributed documents.

WEEK 1: Welcome to Global History and Geography II

  • Introductions
  • Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave”, the nature of sources in history (and journalism)
  • Review, course overview, classroom procedures

REQUIRED STUDENT MATERIALS:  Spiral notebook, folder, writing utensil (pencil or black/blue pen).  Access to a computer and smartphone with a digital camera will be necessary for some homework assignments.  If you do not have access, not to worry, please see Mr. Wentworth and accommodations will be made.

Unit 1: The World in 1750 C.E.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: How are governments formed? How do they stabilize, centralize, and sometimes lose control?

10.1: The world in 1750 was marked by powerful Eurasian states and empires, coastal African kingdoms, and growing European maritime empires. The interactions of these states, empires, and kingdoms disrupted regional trade networks and influenced the development of new global trade networks. (Standards: 2, 3, 5; Themes: ID, GEO, GOV, EXCH)

The Interactions of States, Empires and Kingdoms

  • India: Mughal Empire
  • Japan: Tokugawa Shogunate
  • Russian Empire
  • Eurasia: Ottoman Empire
  • China: Qing Dynasty
  • Ashanti, Benin, and Dahomey ca. 1750

Unit 2: An Age of Revolution & Empire (1750 – 1914 C.E.)

ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How do turning points change history?

10.2: ENLIGHTENMENT, REVOLUTION, AND NATIONALISM: The Enlightenment called into question traditional beliefs and inspired widespread political, economic, and social change. This intellectual movement was used to challenge political authorities in Europe and colonial rule in the Americas. These ideals inspired political and social movements. (Standards: 2, 3, 5; Themes: MOV, TCC, GEO, SOC, GOV, CIV)

 Enlightenment, Revolution, and Nationalism

  • The Enlightenment
  • French Revolution
  • Latin American Independence Movements
  • Reactions to Revolution- Congress of Vienna, Revolutions of 1848
  • Mexican Revolution
  • Global Nationalism- Unification of Italy and Germany, Zionism, Ottoman & Austrian Hungarian Empire
  • Japan and the Meiji Restoration

Causes & Effects of the Industrial Revolution

10.3 CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION: Innovations in agriculture, production, and transportation led to the Industrial Revolution, which originated in Western Europe and spread over time to Japan and other regions. This led to major population shifts and transformed economic and social systems. (Standards: 2, 3, 4; Themes: MOV, TCC, GEO, SOC, ECO, TECH)

  • Industrial Revolution
  • Responses to Industrialization
  • Adam Smith and Karl Marx

 Imperialism

10.4 IMPERIALISM: Western European interactions with Africa and Asia shifted from limited regional contacts along the coast to greater influence and connections throughout these regions. Competing industrialized states sought to control and transport raw materials and create new markets across the world. (Standards: 2, 3, 4; Themes: MOV, TCC, GEO, GOV, EXCH)

 Unit 3: Unresolved Global Conflict (1914 – 1991 C.E.)

Essential Questions: How do cooperation and competition between nations impact the international community and the lives of individuals in the countries involved?

10.5 UNRESOLVED GLOBAL CONFLICT (1914–1945): World War I and World War II led to geopolitical changes, human and environmental devastation, and attempts to bring stability and peace. (Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5; Themes: TCC, GEO, GOV, CIV, TECH, EXCH)

1914-1939

  • World War I, Causes and Effects (debate)
  • World War I Technology
  • Russian Revolution
  • Between the Wars

Efforts to Build Stability After WWI

  • Wilson’s Fourteen Points
  • Treaty of Versailles
  • League of Nations
  • The Weimar Republic in Germany

1939-1945

  • World War II
  • The Atomic Bomb (debate)

Efforts to Build Stability After WWII

  • United Nations

Human Rights Violations

  • Holocaust
  • Armenian Massacre/Genocide
  • Ukrainian Holodomor

10.6 UNRESOLVED GLOBAL CONFLICT (1945–1991: THE COLD WAR): The second half of the 20th century was shaped by the Cold War, a legacy of World War II. The United States and the Soviet Union emerged as global superpowers engaged in ideological, political, economic, and military competition. (Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5; Themes: TCC, GOV, ECO, TECH, EXCH)

1947-1991

  • The Cold War
  • Vietnam War
  • Collapse of the Soviet Union

Unit 4: Decolonization and Nationalism

Essential Questions: How are governments formed? How do they stabilize, centralize, and sometimes lose control?

10.7 DECOLONIZATION AND NATIONALISM (1900–2000): Nationalist and decolonization movements employed a variety of methods, including nonviolent resistance and armed struggle. Tensions and conflicts often continued after independence even as new challenges arose. (Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5; Themes: TCC, GEO, SOC, GOV, CIV)

Decolonization

  • Independence Movements in India and Indochina
  • African Independence Movements
  • Apartheid
  • Chinese Communist Revolution

Nationalism in the Middle East

  • Zionism
  • Creation of Israel
  • Arab-Israeli Conflict (debate)

Unit 5: Tensions Between Traditional Cultures and Modernization

Essential Questions: How does globalization impact institutions, nations, international relations, and the lives of individuals?

10.8 TENSIONS BETWEEN TRADITIONAL CULTURES AND MODERNIZATION: Tensions exist between traditional culture and modernization. Reactions for and against modernization depend on perspective and context. (Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5; Themes: ID, TCC, SOC, GOV, CIV, TECH)

Tension Between Traditional Cultures and Modernization

  • Urbanization
  • Industrialization
  • Iranian Revolution
  • Kemal Atatürk and Turkey

Interactions Between People and Authority

  • Terrorism

Unit 6: Globalization and the Changing Environment

Essential Questions: How does globalization impact institutions, nations, international relations, and the lives of individuals?

10.10 HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS: Since the Holocaust, human rights violations have generated worldwide attention and concern. The United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights has provided a set of principles to guide efforts to protect threatened groups and has served as a lens by which historical occurrences of oppression can be evaluated. (Standards: 2, 5; Themes: ID, TCC, SOC, GOV, CIV)

Globalization

  • Technological Changes
  • HIV/AIDS and spread of infectious disease
  • World Trade Organization, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and microfinance institutions
  • Recessions, Depressions
  • Labor and Migration
  • Environmental Impacts
  • United Nations (UN), North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the European Union, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), etc.
  • Global Security
  • Terrorism
  • Human Rights Violations